SOONER VETERINARY HOSPITAL

OUR SERVICES

Feline Preventative Health Care & Vaccinations

We offer new kitten physical exams and vaccinations as well as annual physical exams and vaccinations.

Veterinarians recommend that your cat should be protected against feline distemper, feline leukemia and rabies.

Feline Distemper: Feline Panleukopenia virus, also commonly known as feline distemper, is a highly contagious and life-threatening viral disease in cats.

Feline Leukemia: Feline Leukemia virus is a disease that impairs the cat’s immune system and causes certain types of cancer. This virus is responsible for a majority of deaths in household cats. Feline leukemia is usually contracted from cat-to-cat transmission and shared dishes or litter pans. It can also be transmitted to a kitten at birth or through the mother’s milk. Kittens are much more susceptible to the virus, as are males and cats that have outdoor access.

Feline Rabies: Rabies is a severe, fatal virus. The primary way the rabies virus is transmitted to cats is through a bite from a disease carrier. This disease has zoonotic characteristics and can be transmitted to humans. Prevention is the key to controlling the rabies virus.

FELV/FIV Testing: We recommend testing kittens and adult cats that are new to your household for feline leukemia and feline immunodeficiency virus before introducing them to the existing cats in your household. This blood test can be done in our hospital and we have the results in 10 minutes.

Preventative Bloodwork: We recommend preventative care screening. Because the signs that your pet is sick are not always obvious, preventative care testing is recommended as part of your dog or cats annual physical exam. Preventative care screening can uncover disease before it is too late. By testing before certain conditions occur, you have a baseline to go by for any issues that might come up in the future.

Canine Preventative Health Care & Vaccinations

We offer new puppy physical exams and vaccinations as well as annual physical exams and vaccinations.

Veterinarians agree that your dog should be protected against those diseases that are most common, highly contagious and cause serious illness. These diseases could include distemper, infectious hepatitis, parvovirus and rabies. Vaccines are initially administered in a series starting when the puppy is about 6-7 weeks old, then certain vaccines are recommended annually. Below is a listing of the most common diseases veterinarians vaccinate against.

Canine Distemper: Canine distemper is a contagious and serious viral illness with no known cure. This disease affects dogs and certain species of wildlife. Young unvaccinated puppies and non-immunized older dogs tend to be more susceptible to the disease.

Canine Parvovirus: Canine parvovirus infection is a highly contagious viral illness. This virus can be spread by direct and indirect contact with another dog’s feces. This virus attacks the dog’s intestines and symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea, especially in puppies. There is evidence that the virus can live in the ground up to a year or more.

Canine Hepatitis: Infectious canine hepatitis is a viral disease that is caused by the adenovirus CAV-1, a type of DNA virus that causes an acute liver infection and an upper respiratory tract infection. This particular virus is seen in wild and feral hosts like the coyote and fox so it is particularly important to maintain current vaccines in our domesticated pets.

Canine Leptospirosis: Canine leptospirosis is an infection of bacterial spirochetes which dogs acquire when subspecies of the leptospirosis bacteria penetrate the skin and spread through the body by way of the bloodstream. The leptospirosis spirochete bacteria are zoonotic, meaning that it can be transmitted to humans. This particular bacteria causes kidney disease and/or failure to occur in both dogs and humans.

Canine Rabies: Rabies is a severe, fatal virus affecting the brain and nervous system. The primary way the rabies virus is transmitted to dogs is through a bite from a disease carrier such as a skunk or bat. This disease has zoonotic characteristics and can be transmitted to humans in the same way. Bordetella: An infectious disease complex that causes what is known as “kennel cough”. This disease can be self limiting, but it can be very damaging to the throat and lungs and create a very harsh cough for several weeks. There are several methods of vaccinating for this disease complex. Methods include the typical injectable vaccine, an intra-nasal vaccine or an oral vaccine.

Heartworm Preventative: We recommend all dogs be on heartworm preventative year-round. Dogs should be tested annually for heartworm infection. Annual testing is necessary even when dogs are on
prevention year-round, to ensure that the prevention program is working. For more information about heartworms go to www.heartwormsociety.org.

Intestinal Parasites: Parasites are a common cause of disease in dogs and cats. Intestinal parasites are parasites that live inside the host animal’s intestinal tract. Examples include worms like hookworms, roundworms, whipworms tapeworms and protozoa, such as, giardia and coccidia. Monthly heartworm preventatives also help control intestinal worms.

Preventative Bloodwork: We recommend preventative care screening. Because the signs that your pet is sick are not always obvious, preventative care testing is recommended as part of your dog or cats annual physical exam. By testing before certain conditions occur, you have a baseline to go by for any issues that might come up in the future.

Wellness Packages

A yearly checkup is essential to the health and well-being of your pets. Our hospital strives to offer the best standard of care for our patients therefore we recommend preventative diagnostic testing as a part of your pet’s yearly checkup.

There are several benefits of preventative diagnostics. It allows us to get a complete picture of your pet’s health, it gives us baseline values for your pet and it can provide early detection of disease.

Canine Adult Wellness Package (1-6 years) includes:

  • Annual Exam
  • Vaccinations – DAPP, Lepto, Rabies, Bordetella
  • Heartworm – This test also includes Lymes, Ehrlichia and Anaplasmosis
  • Fecal – This test looks for Hookworms, Roundworms, Tapeworms, Whipworms, Coccidia and Giardia
  • Adult Wellness Blood Screen – This panel includes a CBC and Chemistry 11 panel

Canine Senior Wellness Package (7+ years) includes:

  • Annual Exam
  • Vaccinations – DAPP, Lepto, Rabies, Bordetella
  • Heartworm – This test also includes Lymes, Ehrlichia and Anaplasmosis
  • Fecal – This test looks for Hookworms, Roundworms, Tapeworms, Whipworms, Coccidia and Giardia
  • Senior Wellness Blood Screen – This panel includes a CBC, Chemistry 25, Urinalysis and Thyroid

Feline Adult Wellness Package: (1-6 years) includes:

  • Annual Exam
  • Vaccinations – HCP (Herpes, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia), Leukemia, Rabies
  • Fecal – This test looks for Hookworms,Roundworms, Tapeworms, Whipworms, Coccidia and Giardia
  • Adult Wellness Blood Screen – This panel includes CBC and Chemistry 11 panel

Feline Senior Wellness Package: (7+ years) includes:

  • Annual Exam
  • Vaccinations – HCP (Herpes, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia), Leukemia, Rabies
  • Fecal – This test looks for Hookworms, Roundworms, Tapeworms, Whipworms, Coccidia and Giardia
  • Senior Wellness Blood Screen – This panel includes CBC, Chemistry 25, Urinalysis and Thyroid
Bloodwork

At Sooner Veterinary Hospital, we feel that diagnostic testing is important in providing a high level of quality medicine for your pet. We routinely recommend blood work for many reasons. The following list includes some of the more common panels of blood work we regularly recommend.

Preanesthetic Bloodwork: Certain medical conditions can create complications for dogs and cats under anesthesia so we recommend some basic blood tests prior to anesthesia. These blood tests will help reveal potential conditions and determine if your dog or cat’s vital organs are functioning properly, helping us create an individualized anesthetic plan for your dog or cat. Even if preanesthetic testing doesn’t reveal any issues, it establishes baseline results for your dog or cat, which are helpful for future reference in your pet’s medical care.

Preventative Bloodwork: Because the signs that your pet is sick are not always obvious, preventative care testing is recommended as part of your dog or cats annual exam. Preventative care screening can uncover disease before it is too late. By testing before certain conditions occur, you have a baseline to go by for any issues that come up in the future.

Senior Wellness Bloodwork: Most dogs and cats are considered senior pets at age 7 years and above. We recommend annual senior wellness bloodwork. The profile is comprehensive and includes the following tests: complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile, urinalysis and thyroid hormone measurement diagnostic testing. The complete blood count measures red and white blood cells, hemoglobin, platelets, and other parameters. The biochemistry panel evaluates several measurements including functional tests of the liver, kidney, and pancreas, glucose, cholesterol, electrolytes, triglycerides, and calcium. Urine concentrating ability, blood, protein, and glucose are among the factors assessed in the urinalysis. The thyroid hormone level suggests the presence of an abnormally-functioning thyroid gland.

Heartworm Testing: Heartworm infection and disease is endemic in our location which can lead to life threatening heart failure. We recommend all dogs be on a heartworm preventative year-round. Dogs should be tested annually for heartworm infection. Annual testing is necessary even when dogs are on prevention year-round, to ensure that the prevention program is working. For more information about heartworms go to www.heartwormsociety.org.

Lyme’s Disease/Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis: Your dog can be screened for these three tick borne diseases with a simple blood test in our hospital. Lyme disease is one of the most common tick-transmitted diseases in the world but only causes symptoms in 5%-10% of affected dogs. Ehrlichiosis in dogs is usually spread by the brown dog tick and lone star tick. This disease is seen throughout the year and throughout the United States. Anaplasmosis is a lesser- known but also significant tick-borne disease. It is transmitted by the deer tick and the western black-legged tick. We test for heartworms with the Snap 4DX Test which tests for Heartworms and screens for exposure to the three tick borne diseases, Lyme, Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis.

Feline Leukemia/Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: We recommend testing kittens and adult cats that are new to your household for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus before introducing them to the existing cats in your household. This blood test can be done in our hospital and we have the results in 10 minutes. Unfortunately, there is no cure for either of these viruses, but if we know your cat has one of them, there are important considerations that can be taken in the care of your cat to assure he or she stays as healthy as possible.

Radiology (X-ray)

Radiology (X-ray)

We offer digital radiology at Sooner Veterinary Hospital. Images are exposed within seconds and digitally saved. Radiographs are used to evaluate injuries and conditions which require more than external examination. Radiology equipment gives us a non-invasive way to observe your pet’s internal structures so that we can provide a more thorough and accurate diagnosis. Radiographs are used to detect many things including bone fractures, bladder stones, tumours, and certain foreign objects that your pet may have eaten. In certain situations, we can take radiographs immediately. But at times and depending on the exact view that is needed, your pet may need to be dropped off for the day if radiographs are necessary. At times patients may need to be lightly sedated for radiographs and in some cases, they may require general anaesthesia. Copies of the radiographs can be burned on a CD or emailed if needed for a referral to a specialist.

Dental Radiology

Dental radiology is the most vital tool in veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs are essential in making an accurate diagnosis. Dental radiographs are also essential in performing dental procedures, in evaluating procedural success and in the documentation of dental and oral health. We provide a comprehensive oral health assessment and treatment plan when your pet is presented for dental prophylaxis. Two-thirds of your pet’s teeth are under the gums and are not viewable. Radiographs help in the assessment of the teeth (fractures or internal disease) and the surrounding soft tissue (periodontal disease, gingivitis, stomatitis, cysts, fistulas or tumours).

Ultrasound

Ultrasound

Ultrasound is a means of seeing what lies beneath the surface by sending sound waves into it and registering an image that corresponds to the way the waves bounce off the structures within it. It is very non-invasive and can be incredibly helpful in diagnosis of an internal problem.

No pain is felt during the procedure, however, discomfort from pressure may be experienced. In general, animals do not need to be anesthetized for an ultrasound, but sedatives are usually given to make your pet more comfortable. The ultrasound images are sent electronically to a veterinary radiologist that generates a report of the findings. We usually receive the results within 24 hours. Once we review the report, the findings will be discussed in a follow up appointment or with a telephone conversation.

Electrocardiogram

An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a diagnostic test that records the electrical activity of your pet’s heart. It is a non-invasive test. The heart’s electrical activity is recorded by attaching small contact electrodes to the limbs and chest wall. We then send the results electronically to be reviewed by a board certified veterinary cardiologist. The ECG is a recommended test for all animals with abnormal heart sounds &/or rhythms and can be useful for identification of heart enlargement or drug effects on the heart.

General Surgery
The doctors at Sooner Veterinary Hospital have many years of experience performing a variety of surgical procedures. We have a highly trained surgical team to provide your pet with the safest and most up to date anaesthetic protocols individualized for each patient. Our surgical suite is equipped with patient monitoring equipment to ensure the health and safety of your pet. We utilize lasers in our surgical protocols to decrease bleeding and inflammation along with promoting faster healing times.

We offer a wide range of surgical procedures for our patients. Some examples are:

Ovariohysterectomy (spay)
Neuter
Hernia Repair
Caesarian Section
Laceration Repair
Simple and Extended Mass Removals
Bladder Stone Removal
Declaw
Oral surgery including dental prophylaxis and extractions

We recommend pre-surgical bloodwork on all animals undergoing surgery. We require bloodwork on all animals 7 years of age and older to make sure your pet does not have any underlying issues before using anesthesia. During your pet’s surgical procedure, there will be a dedicated team member who closely monitors your pet during and after the procedure. Pain management is a priority and all pets are given pain medication to reduce discomfort and encourage a speedy recovery

Laser

Laser

There are three major advantages of using a CO2 laser during surgery when compared to a traditional stainless steel surgical scalpel technique. The advantages include decreased pain during and after surgery, reduced bleeding and blood loss and reduced risk of infection post surgery.

Decreased post-operative pain is accomplished when the laser seals nerve endings as it cuts. This reduces pain impulses from the surgery site.

Reduced bleeding and blood loss is achieved through cauterization of blood vessels as the laser beam vaporizes the tissue and seals the capillaries.

Reduced risk of surgical infection occurs due to the superheating of the tissues in the incision site, destroying any bacteria that are present at the time of surgery.

Allowing our staff of veterinarians to use the surgical laser to perform the surgery is a great benefit to your pet to assure he or she has the best pain free surgery experience as possible.

Laser Therapy

At Sooner Veterinary Hospital, we use a therapy laser for many reasons. It can be beneficial directly after surgery to reduce inflammation in the surgical site, used on acute injury sites and also applied to an area of chronic concern like joint disease. Typically, the primary target is inflammatory tissues.

Laser therapy is a very helpful tool during post-operative recovery. Laser therapy helps to alleviate pain and stimulate the healing process after surgery. Because it works directly on injured or affected areas, laser treatments can help speed up healing, strengthen muscle and tissue and improve mobility.

Laser therapy is often used in animals with arthritis. The number of treatments, type of laser and duration of exposure will be determined in the treatment plan. During your dog’s session, the assistant will move the laser “wand” over the treatment area to deliver the laser to the affected tissues. Depending on the issue being treated, the exposure to the laser may take 20 to 30 minutes. Treatment usually starts out at 2-3 times a week then decreases to 1 time a week or every other week depending on the progress.

Laser therapy is a very innovative treatment therapy that is non-invasive and safe. If your pet is having issues with arthritis and is unable to take regular anti-inflammatory medications, you might find laser therapy to be key in managing your pet’s pain.